Magic Users

The World of Langthil

The general term most often used is “caster”, though you’ll hear “mage” as well.

You can break it down further, however. Wizards are those who have devoted their lives to the study of magic, while sorcerers tend to do it more on how it “feels”, if that makes sense. Witches (which contrary to our own world’s preconceptions can be male or female) are usually sorcerers (though can be wizards) who are distinguished by their very solitary nature; we might call them “hedge witches”.

Then there’s the breakdown along the type of magic they specialize in. Elementalists practice Elemental magic, while Arcanists practice Arcane magic (the two are very different types of magic). Since these are still very broad categories, you tend to find even narrower specializations, which can go by all kinds of different names. Elementalists tend to focus on one of the 5 Primary Elements, e.g. a Pyromage or Fire Mage. Arcanists often narrow their focus to one of dozens of overlapping schools, becoming Conjurers, Seers, etc.

Shamans and Wardens are a special breed, as they tend to practice both Elemental and Arcane magic; their focus is on nature magic, with Shamans further specializing on animals while Wardens specialize on trees and plants. Collectively they’re sometimes called “druids”, which is a word derived from “Dryads”, the race of tree-people from whom it is believed nature magic – often called “Dryad magic” or “druidic magic” – originates.

And then there’s the Divine casters. Arguably, they aren’t technically “casters”, as they actually just ask their respective gods to intervene, the results of which are often called “miracles” rather than “spells”. There’s a number of different names for them: Priests tend to hang out at temples, and usually focus on requesting healing and curative miracles; Clerics are often found traveling/adventuring, spreading the worship of their respective gods, and tend to focus on healing as well as cleansing and other supporting miracles; Paladins are similar to clerics, but with more of a martial focus, and usually only use cleansing miracles; Templars and Inquisitors are very similar to Paladins, except their focus is less on protection and more on rooting out perceived threats to their gods, fellow worshipers, or the faith in general.

It’s also worth mentioning Alchemists here. This is a further specialization (usually of Divine or Arcane magic, but you’ll find Elementalist Alchemists too) where the focus is on “distilling” spells into an imbibeable form – usually potions, but you’ll find other consumables used as the base as well. Alchemists are distinct from Herbalists, who gather and use beneficial herbs, and Apothecaries, who take Herbalists’ herbs and further refine them into various medicines; there’s (usually) no magic involved in the practice of Herbalism and Apothecaries.

The general term most often used is "caster", though you'll hear "mage" as well. You can break it down further, however. [[Wizards]] are those who have devoted their lives to the study of magic, while [[sorcerers]] tend to do it more on how it "feels", if that makes sense. [[Witches]] (which contrary to our own world's preconceptions can be male or female) are usually sorcerers (though can be wizards) who are distinguished by their very solitary nature; we might call them "hedge witches". Then there's the breakdown along the type of magic they specialize in. Elementalists practice [[Elemental magic]], while Arcanists practice [[Arcane magic]] (the two are very different [[types of magic]]). Since these are still very broad categories, you tend to find even narrower specializations, which can go by all kinds of different names. Elementalists tend to focus on one of the 5 [[Primary Elements]], e.g. a [[Pyromage]] or Fire Mage. Arcanists often narrow their focus to one of dozens of overlapping [[Schools of magic|schools]], becoming Conjurers, Seers, etc. [[Shamans]] and [[Wardens]] are a special breed, as they tend to practice both Elemental and Arcane magic; their focus is on nature magic, with Shamans further specializing on animals while Wardens specialize on trees and plants. Collectively they're sometimes called "[[druids]]", which is a word derived from "[[Dryads]]", the race of tree-people from whom it is believed nature magic -- often called "Dryad magic" or "druidic magic" -- originates. And then there's the [[Divine magic|Divine casters]]. Arguably, they aren't technically "casters", as they actually just ask their respective gods to intervene, the results of which are often called "miracles" rather than "spells". There's a number of different names for them: [[Priests]] tend to hang out at temples, and usually focus on requesting healing and curative miracles; [[Clerics]] are often found traveling/adventuring, spreading the worship of their respective gods, and tend to focus on healing as well as cleansing and other supporting miracles; [[Paladins]] are similar to clerics, but with more of a martial focus, and usually only use cleansing miracles; [[Templars]] and [[Inquisitors]] are very similar to Paladins, except their focus is less on protection and more on rooting out perceived threats to their gods, fellow worshipers, or the faith in general. It's also worth mentioning [[Alchemy|Alchemists]] here. This is a further specialization (usually of Divine or Arcane magic, but you'll find Elementalist Alchemists too) where the focus is on "distilling" spells into an imbibeable form -- usually potions, but you'll find other consumables used as the base as well. Alchemists are distinct from [[Herbalism|Herbalists]], who gather and use beneficial herbs, and [[Apothecary|Apothecaries]], who take Herbalists' herbs and further refine them into various medicines; there's (usually) no magic involved in the practice of Herbalism and Apothecaries.
Last modified on Jan. 4, 2018, 1:12 p.m.