Charles the Great Liberator

The World of Langthil

When humans served as slaves to the Eldrin, who had given them the gift of civilization, a great orator rose up among the enslaved and spoke of freedom. His message quickly spread among the slaves, and even spread throughout the great Eldrin Empire, to every city. The humans found hope in this new leader, and soon were ready to rise up and rebuke their masters.

Charles and a cohort of his fellow slaves one night broke free of their cell. In the pre-dawn light they marched up the main street of the city and toward the palace. Stopped on the palace stairs by the palace guard, they began shouting to be heard by the prince. When he finally emerged on a balcony above them, Charles delivered their simple demand: The freedom of every human.

The slaves fully expected their demands to be rejected and a great rebellion to begin. They were not, however, prepared for the response they actually received. The Eldrin, it turned out, had already decided that their experiment with humans was a failure, and they were ready to end it; besides, they had found a new race that appeared would make superior slave stock anyway.

The prince granted the slaves their petition.

By noon on that day, every human was freed from slavery throughout the Empire – and promptly ejected from the Eldrin cities. The humans turned to Charles for leadership, but he had only thought as far as the war for their freedom, and with no war to fight he did not know what to do.

The other humans quickly realized that their so-called liberator was in fact not the leader they needed. Humans spent the next many years struggling just to survive in a world where they were unwelcome in any land. They eventually settled their own outlaw outposts, generally deep in the wilderness and far from any other cities, surviving by raiding traders and avoiding the patrols that went looking for them.

None, however, would follow Charles anymore. The human language did take one thing from him, however, and added a new word: Charlatan.

When humans served as slaves to the Eldrin, who had given them the gift of civilization, a great orator rose up among the enslaved and spoke of freedom. His message quickly spread among the slaves, and even spread throughout the great Eldrin Empire, to every city. The humans found hope in this new leader, and soon were ready to rise up and rebuke their masters. Charles and a cohort of his fellow slaves one night broke free of their cell. In the pre-dawn light they marched up the main street of the city and toward the palace. Stopped on the palace stairs by the palace guard, they began shouting to be heard by the prince. When he finally emerged on a balcony above them, Charles delivered their simple demand: The freedom of every human. The slaves fully expected their demands to be rejected and a great rebellion to begin. They were not, however, prepared for the response they actually received. The Eldrin, it turned out, had already decided that their experiment with humans was a failure, and they were ready to end it; besides, they had found a new race that appeared would make superior slave stock anyway. The prince granted the slaves their petition. By noon on that day, every human was freed from slavery throughout the Empire – and promptly ejected from the Eldrin cities. The humans turned to Charles for leadership, but he had only thought as far as the war for their freedom, and with no war to fight he did not know what to do. The other humans quickly realized that their so-called liberator was in fact not the leader they needed. Humans spent the next many years struggling just to survive in a world where they were unwelcome in any land. They eventually settled their own outlaw outposts, generally deep in the wilderness and far from any other cities, surviving by raiding traders and avoiding the patrols that went looking for them. None, however, would follow Charles anymore. The human language did take one thing from him, however, and added a new word: Charlatan.
Last modified on Sept. 25, 2017, 12:41 p.m.