Akkarah

The World of Langthil

Akkarah was once a powerful nation that controlled the entire southern portion of the western continent. Ruled by a good king, the people prospered and thrived, and the kingdom enjoyed a glorious golden age.

When the king unexpectedly passed away, however, his son (whom everyone suspected had poisoned his father, but nobody could prove it and likely wouldn’t have been able to touch him anyway if they could) ascended to the throne. Greedy and drunk with power, the new king launched a campaign of conquest to conquer the rest of the continent. The kingdom’s glory days meant that it could – and did – field a massive army, in some cases sending more soldiers to conquer a nation than their targets even had people. The Akkarian army swept across the continent unabated, while nation after nation fell – those who didn’t surrender were in many cases simply destroyed outright, though even surrendering your country wouldn’t ensure you kept your head.

Despite the Akkarian success and power, the young king’s advisers cautioned him not to invade the Eldrin empire, that it would mean a crushing defeat if he tried. The young king was enraged by such “treasonous” advice, and after supervising the execution of his advisers he launched the attack on the Eldrin empire, sending his entire army straight up the center of their southern border. He knew the the Empire, being feudal in nature, would need time to rally and muster its army, and he intended to blitz straight through the mountains and take their capital before they could do that.

The first castle, guarding the central and largest pass through the mountains, fell very quickly. Had the boy’s advisers still been around, they could have pointed out that it was far too easy; in his arrogance, however, he assumed it was just the success of his army and the brilliance of his plan. When his army began marching through the pass, however, the Eldrin sprang their trap.

The Eldrin Empress had seen the writing on the wall, of course, and had already mustered the full force of the Eldrin army. Still outnumbered 3-1, her generals had ordered the castle to be guarded by only a skeleton force, and moved the rest of the army out of the way.

As the Akkarian army advanced through the pass, the Eldrin triggered a series of avalanches in the mountains, cutting off their advance while also decimating their numbers and throwing them into chaos. At the same time, the Eldrin army, already behind the Akkarians, stormed into the pass. The surprise of the attack, combined with the chaos started by the avalanches, meant that the entire battle was a rout and the Akkarian army was slaughtered to the last soldier.

This loss lead to all of the conquered nations re-declaring their independence from Akkarah, while also emboldening the people to rise up and storm the young king’s palace, razing it to the ground and brutally murdering the king. Today, the result is that Akkarah is no more than a moderately-sized city-state, and the ruins of the old palace still lie on the highest hill as a stark reminder of what happened.

Akkarah was once a powerful nation that controlled the entire southern portion of the western continent. Ruled by a good king, the people prospered and thrived, and the kingdom enjoyed a glorious golden age. When the king unexpectedly passed away, however, his son (whom everyone suspected had poisoned his father, but nobody could prove it and likely wouldn’t have been able to touch him anyway if they could) ascended to the throne. Greedy and drunk with power, the new king launched a campaign of conquest to conquer the rest of the continent. The kingdom’s glory days meant that it could – and did – field a massive army, in some cases sending more soldiers to conquer a nation than their targets even had people. The Akkarian army swept across the continent unabated, while nation after nation fell – those who didn’t surrender were in many cases simply destroyed outright, though even surrendering your country wouldn’t ensure you kept your head. Despite the Akkarian success and power, the young king’s advisers cautioned him not to invade the Eldrin empire, that it would mean a crushing defeat if he tried. The young king was enraged by such “treasonous” advice, and after supervising the execution of his advisers he launched the attack on the Eldrin empire, sending his entire army straight up the center of their southern border. He knew the the Empire, being feudal in nature, would need time to rally and muster its army, and he intended to blitz straight through the mountains and take their capital before they could do that. The first castle, guarding the central and largest pass through the mountains, fell very quickly. Had the boy’s advisers still been around, they could have pointed out that it was far too easy; in his arrogance, however, he assumed it was just the success of his army and the brilliance of his plan. When his army began marching through the pass, however, the Eldrin sprang their trap. The Eldrin Empress had seen the writing on the wall, of course, and had already mustered the full force of the Eldrin army. Still outnumbered 3-1, her generals had ordered the castle to be guarded by only a skeleton force, and moved the rest of the army out of the way. As the Akkarian army advanced through the pass, the Eldrin triggered a series of avalanches in the mountains, cutting off their advance while also decimating their numbers and throwing them into chaos. At the same time, the Eldrin army, already behind the Akkarians, stormed into the pass. The surprise of the attack, combined with the chaos started by the avalanches, meant that the entire battle was a rout and the Akkarian army was slaughtered to the last soldier. This loss lead to all of the conquered nations re-declaring their independence from Akkarah, while also emboldening the people to rise up and storm the young king’s palace, razing it to the ground and brutally murdering the king. Today, the result is that Akkarah is no more than a moderately-sized city-state, and the ruins of the old palace still lie on the highest hill as a stark reminder of what happened.
Last modified on Sept. 25, 2017, 12:41 p.m.